Revision Table and editing

Feb 11, 2011 at 12:38 AM

I have a test project where there is a small newly created wilderness area near where i live. I need to delete the inaccurate tiger files and replace them with kosher BLM data. I have checked this all out with the BLM and OSM community so no need to go there.  Once you import the data with the extension can you do operations like erase or clip where you have to create a new feature inside the geodatabase or do you have to do all your edits to the features created on import? (point line and polygon) I tried renaming the erase file to the original file name but i imagine this messes up the revision table.  If i delete a bunch of tiger roads do i need to delete all the points that are actually just vertices of those roads that are in the point feature that comes in on import? I assume i can do a cut and paste of the more accurate BLM trails into the OSM geodatabase. (I have physically already done this but wondering if that messes up the revision table I assume that part of the reason to create this extension would be to make it easier to do bulk import of higher quality data - maybe not) Maybe the only option is to trace them? I hope not i have bigger projects than this one in mind.

Where does the revision table reside? I can't seem to find one. I assume it is in the geodatabase.  I started over with newly imported OSM data and tried to find one after making a few simple edits but no luck.

Thanks

Tom

Feb 11, 2011 at 8:25 PM

After redoing the download and being sure to only work with the files created - no erase that creates a new feature and no cutting and pasting - I am finding the revision table. I was hoping not to have to trace everything using the better data. It is definitely way too much work to go in and move vertices around to match the better data in this case. If someone else has used this ESRI extension to do bulk updates without having to trace things or move existing data I would still like to hear about it.

Tom

Developer
Feb 15, 2011 at 4:54 AM

Tom,

yes, that functionality is supported but the overall workflow hasn't been completely worked out. Here are the steps required:

1. Download data for the area you are working in.

2. Extract the attributes from the downloaded data into which you would like to map your data. Essentially you are preparing a target for the field mapping in step 5.

3. Create a feature describing your bounding box of your existing BLM data.

4. Use the feature from step 3 in the erase tool to cut out the "old" OSM data.

5. Use the append tool to copy your BLM data into the appropriate OSM feature class. At this point be sure to set up the appropriate field mapping from your data and match them into the normalized OSM attributes from step 2.

6. Run the "Combine OSM Attributes" tool to merge the normalized fields into the collective OSM tag field.

7. Upload the changes.

As a general recommendation if you are looking at the data as "raw" feature classes in ArcMap you should use a definition query of "supportingElement = 'no'" and then work against those layers. You as the user shouldn't care about geometry primitives of OSM nodes and ways, but focus on the map features presented as points, lines, and polygons.

Thomas

 

Feb 16, 2011 at 1:04 AM
Thanks for the detailed reply. I am traveling so it will be about a week before i can check that process out.

One question and i should probably post this to the import mailing list of OSM but i "successfully " uploaded an area with the Arcmap extension only it is not showing in OSM. With the default potlacth editor they send you and email that your gps upload was successful and after that you can see your results as you digitize your gps file, I am not getting any feedback from any OSM folks about any problems. I have not used JOSM so do not know how the feedback goes on that but it is a similar process where you check out an area of data and then check it back in with the changes.

There may be some issues with the tags as there are no tags for boundaries of public land that i can see other than National Park, The local national forest boundary is national park in OSM for instance. There is of course a huge difference between a national forest and a national park in the USA. In the area i am working on it is a wilderness area inside the BLM. I guess i have to make a recommendation to them about adding some tags. These issues are more for the OSM mailing lists. But if you happen to know. OSM is certainly an ambitious volunteer project.

Tom

----- Original Message -----
From: temge <[email removed]>
Date: Monday, February 14, 2011 8:54 pm
Subject: Re: Revision Table and editing [esriosmeditor:245540]

> From: temge
>
> Tom,yes, that functionality is supported but the overall workflow
> hasn't been completely worked out. Here are the steps required:1.
> Download data for the area you are working in.2. Extract the
> attributes from the downloaded data into which you would like to
> map your data. Essentially you are preparing a target for the field
> mapping in step 5.3. Create a feature describing your bounding box
> of your existing BLM data.4. Use the feature from step 3 in the
> erase tool to cut out the "old" OSM data.5. Use the append tool to
> copy your BLM data into the appropriate OSM feature class. At this
> point be sure to set up the appropriate field mapping from your
> data and match them into the normalized OSM attributes from step
> 2.6. Run the "Combine OSM Attributes" tool to merge the normalized
> fields into the collective OSM tag field.7. Upload the changes.As a
> general recommendation if you are looking at the data as "raw"
> feature classes in ArcMap you should use a definition query of
> "supportingElement = 'no'" and then work against those layers. You
> as the user shouldn't care about geometry primitives of OSM nodes
> and ways, but focus on the map features presented as points, lines,
> and polygons.Thomas
>
>
Developer
Feb 16, 2011 at 1:36 AM

Tom,

that is correct, just because you have created something and tagged it appropriately to the type of the feature doesn't neccessarily mean that the object itself shows up on the standard OpenStreetMap rendering. The general assumption is to provide the tags to best describe the type of object and hope that the rendering eventually catches up once the community approves it.

I'd imagine that your situation would be a question for "tagging" email list at http://lists.openstreetmap.org/listinfo/tagging.